Taizé service part of series at St. Mark’s

On Sunday, Sept. 19, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 335 Locust St., Johnstown, will host a 6 p.m. Taizé service as part of its Community Common Prayer Series.

This unique form of Christian worship was developed in 1940 by Brother Roger Schütz, founding member of the ecumenical monastic Taizé community located in Taizé, Saône-et-Loire, Burgundy, France.

The Taizé community is composed of more than one hundred brothers, from Catholic and Protestant traditions, who originate from about 30 countries across the world. The purpose of the community is service to young people and promotion of ecumenism. The community, though Western European in origin, has sought to include people and traditions worldwide. This inclusivity is most notable in their music and prayers where songs are sung in many languages and have included chants and icons from the Eastern Orthodox traditions.

The singing of distinctive and much-repeated prayer chants during candlelit prayer services is one of the Taizé community’s trademarks. The music emphasizes simple phrases, usually lines from Psalms or other pieces of Scripture, repeated or sung in canon. The repetition is designed to help meditation and prayer.

The service is free. All are welcome, according to the Rev. Nancy Threadgill, who said, “Please wear a mask and social distance.”

For additional information about the service or St. Mark’s Community Common Prayer Series, contact Threadgill at 814-535-6797 or revnancy-stmarks@atlanticbbn.net

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